Animal Rights Zone

Fighting for animal liberation and an end to speciesism

Transcript of Louise Wallis' Live ARZone Guest Chat

Transcript of Louise Wallis’ Live ARZone Guest Chat

17 September 2011

6pm US Eastern Time

11pm UK Time

18 September 2011

8am Australian Eastern Standard Time

 

 

 

 

Carolyn Bailey:

ARZone would like to welcome Louise Wallis, as today’s Live Chat Guest.

 

Louise Wallis, a vegan of 29 years, has worked for the UK’s National Anti-Vivisection Society (where she organised a national march attended by 25,000 people), before leaving to carry out undercover investigations in two animal research labs (Smith Kline Beecham and St. Bartholomew’s Medical School).

 

In 1991, Louise was elected President of  the UK Vegan Society, where she co-ordinated the production of “Truth or Dairy” (the first film about veganism), and founded “World Vegan Day” in 1994.

 

She took time out from activism to focus on music, and in 2006, under the name “Luminous” was voted one of the world’s Top 100 Female D.J.s [http://www.shejay.net/top100femaledjs2.php] She also sings in the band Luminous Frenzy, whose music was featured in the film McLibel [www.myspace.com/luminousfrenzy]

 

Louise is also a freelance writer and journalist, and recently interviewed Moby.

 

She recently created two vegan themed DJ mixes. Her first “the unexpectedly genius”. ‘Vegan Anthems” mix (which features 17 songs with a vegan theme by well-known bands) has received over 1030 plays. Louise has also created a follow-up mix “Vegan Artists” featuring 14 tracks by prominent vegan musicians, which can be heard here: www.mixcloud.com/DJLuminous/vegan-artists-from-sigur-ros-to-black-sabbath/

 

Louise feels passionately that we need to campaign for human rights alongside animal rights. She is an expert on disability hate crime and works for Respond www.respond.org.uk a charity supporting people with learning disabilities who have experienced abuse and hate crime.

 

Louise welcomes the opportunity to speak with ARZone members on a variety of topics today, would you please join with me in welcoming Louise to ARZone?

 

Welcome, Louise!

 

Jason Ward:

Welcome to ARZone Louise!!!

 

Sadia:

Great pleasure to have you here, Ms. Wallis! Thank you for being here. And Welcome!

 

Matt Bowen:

Hey Louise!

 

Kate:

Welcome!

 

Louise Wallis:

Hello Carolyn & everyone, it's great to be here!

 

Brooke Cameron:

Hi there, Louise, welcome!

 

Fifi Leigh:

hi, Louise

 

Jesse Newman:

Hello there :-)

 

Earl Fummerton:

Hi Louise!! :-)

 

Mangus O’Shales:

hi

 

Sky:

Hi

 

Carolyn Bailey:

Louise will be responding to her pre-registered questions first, and then we’ll open the chat up for all members to engage her.

 

Please refrain from interrupting Louise during the first session, and feel free to send a private message to an admin if you wish to address her at any time. This can be done by clicking on their names and selecting “Private Chat”.

 

I’d now like to ask Matt Bowen to ask Louise her first question, thanks, Matt.

 

Matt Bowen:

Thanks, Carolyn. Hi Louise! In the time you were President of the Vegan Society, is there anything in particular you’re most proud of achieving?

 

Louise Wallis:

Hi Matthew. Yes! Two things: World Vegan Day, and coordinating the production of Truth or Dairy, the Society’s first film.

 

Creating World Vegan Day was a great way to mark the Society’s 50th birthday. It was easy too, we just had to pick a date and then announce it. We knew the Society had been founded in November 1944, but didn’t know the exact date, so I decided to go for the 1st November. Partly because I liked the idea of this date coinciding with Samhain/Halloween and the Day of the Dead - traditional times for feasting and celebration. Both apt and auspicious. And it’s thrilling for me now to see how the event has taken off worldwide.

 

Making Truth or Dairy – now that was a major project! I set up a ‘Film Fund’, which raised a lot of money, but we still relied heavily on favours and goodwill. My friends Franny and Boo Armstrong had volunteered their services as their dad Peter worked in TV and had kindly agreed to let them use his equipment & facilities. Four of us made the film – the other team member being Frank Hutson (my partner). Franny wrote a great script - upbeat and humorous - and Benjamin Zephaniah, a famous poet/performer, generously agreed to present it.

 

Having never made a film before we hadn’t a clue what we were letting ourselves in for. We ended up donating six months of our lives to the Vegan Society. It was incredibly stressful and at times we wished we had never started, but we prevailed in the end and were all hugely proud of the result. It helped to take veganism to the masses and was especially useful for showing in schools.

 

My favourite scene is presenter Benjamin suckling on the teat of a pantomime (costume) cow, and the cow looking down at him as if to say what the hell do you think you’re doing? (Yes pantomime cows can act!) I think this image conveys the absurdity of milk-drinking better than any other. We didn’t know it then but Truth or Dairy also launched Franny’s film career. She is now an award winning film director, best known for making McLibel (a documentary about two activists who were sued by McDonalds and refused to back down), and more recently ‘The Age of Stupid’ a climate change blockbuster.

 

Matt Bowen:

Thanks for that, Louise!

 

Louise Wallis:

You're welcome

 

Carolyn Bailey:

Thanks Louise, Jason Ward would like to ask a question on behalf of Barbara DeGrande now, thanks, Jay

 

Jason Ward:

Thanks Carolyn - Hi Louise :-)

 

Louise Wallis:

Hi Jason

 

Jason Ward:

Barb's Question: Soon it will be World Vegan Day. Any ideas for those of us involved in local AR groups?

 

Louise Wallis:

Hi Barbara. Yes, World Vegan Day is looming, and extra special this year as the date will be 1.11.11. The day provides a wealth of opportunities to raise awareness of veganism. Many events tend to revolve around food e.g. inviting friends or family round for a spectacular vegan dinner, or organizing a free food tasting event in your local town. But the possibilities are endless. I would love to see more campaigning events taking on the dairy industry.

 

Many years ago I joined a group of women calling themselves ‘Mothers Against Milk’ (MAM) in a peaceful protest outside a livestock market where young calves were being sold. We stood opposite the market entrance holding placards. It was a small protest around 10-15 of us but that was all we needed. Members of the public are curious to know what you’re up to, and many will come over to find out.

 

There’s something about the summary execution of newborn calves - the snuffing out of a life before it’s even begun - that deeply offends me. The dairy industry has not only managed to conceal this mass infanticide, it has conned the public with one of (if not the) most successful and cynical marketing campaigns in history. We need to do more to challenge the lie that milk is wholesome & benign.

 

I think subvertising is a v interesting area ripe for exploitation. I was sat on a tube train the other day when an advert caught my eye. I was still trying to figure it out, when suddenly I realized from the twitter.com/uksubvertising address on the bottom that it was a sub-vert. It was incredibly well done, almost subliminal, in the style of an election campaign advert. It had a photo of the UK prime-minister on one side and the former President of Egypt (Mubarak) on the other. In the middle was text saying  “We’ll block Facebook and Twitter during any ‘rioting’ to keep you safe”. It made my day! It’s such a brilliant idea – slipping your own adverts over the top of ‘real’ adverts with no-one being the wiser. And thousands of tube passengers subconsciously imbibing your message. I would love to see someone design some subverts that subtly mimic and undermine the dairy industry’s ads.

 

So I say let’s get creative and subversive this World Vegan Day 1.11.11. Oh yes and most important of all, have fun! 

 

Jason Ward:

Thank you Louise - Carolyn Bailey has the next question that she will now ask...

 

Carolyn Bailey:

Hi Louise, you gave a speech at the national ‘March for Farmed Animals’ on 2nd October 2010 (World Farm Animals Day), in which you said “I think it’s high time we reclaimed the word vegan too. I’ve noticed that many groups promote vegetarianism rather than veganism, because they worry that it will alienate supporters. I disagree. The more we use the word vegan, the more appealing it will become.”

 

I couldn’t agree with you more, thank you for saying that! Do you have any advice on how to encourage other advocates to understand the importance of doing this, when it seems, in my experience, it is other advocates who appear scared to use the word vegan, more than the general public being concerned with hearing it?

 

Louise Wallis:

Thanks Carolyn, I’m glad you agree. I think this is a classic example of vegans internalizing negative stereotypes about vegans and/or veganism, and perhaps not even realizing that they are doing so. Whenever you shy away from using the word vegan you reject a part of yourself. Why do that to yourself?

 

I would ask other advocates how we can expect others to embrace veganism when we won’t even embrace the word? I think we need to sell the ethical consistency angle of veganism more, and say that in fact it simplifies life. Vegetarians can drive themselves mad, trying to ensure the eggs in everything they eat are free-range and the cheese made with vegetable rennet. They frequently fail, and I’m sure the constant reinforcement of feelings of failure can contribute to some people giving up vegetarianism as a bad job.

 

Many vegans regret not being told the truth sooner, and were grateful when they were. Of course there will be people who don’t feel able to go vegan overnight, and who will choose to go vegetarian first. But that is their choice: we shouldn’t feel a need to nanny people, to pander to that choice or indeed make that choice for them by promoting vegetarianism. They are adults they can take the truth, and we cannot un-know what we know about the dairy & egg industries.

 

I think you are right Carolyn when you say you think it is other advocates who are more scared of using the word than the public are of hearing it. On the plus side some animal advocacy groups have realized this and now only promote veganism.

 

Carolyn Bailey:

Thanks, Louise. I agree with you about vegans regretting not being told the truth sooner. I was vegetarian for some time before even knowing there was such a thing as a vegan. If only I’d heard it earlier.

 

Louise Wallis:

Yes many people feel that way

 

Carolyn Bailey:

Thanks for your reply! Tim Gier is up next with his question, thanks, Tim.

 

Tim Gier:

When I read statistics about the number of human children dying every day from preventable diseases and hunger, or about the widespread abuses committed against women all over the world it’s easy for me to be pessimistic about the future of animal liberation. Would you talk about the connections you see between the oppression of human and non-human beings?

 

Louise Wallis:

Hi Tim. I think it’s safe to say that it tends to be people with few problems themselves who have the capacity to try and improve the lot of others - whether that be other people or animals. 

 

Greater protection for animals will only be achieved alongside greater protection for human beings, the two go hand in hand and we separate them at our peril. It’s very easy to get sucked into the vegan bubble and socialize only with other vegans and only talk about vegan issues. I know because I lived in the vegan bubble myself for many years!  Separatism can be important at times but it’s important not to get stuck there, and remain in the vegan ghetto.

 

For the last ten years I have worked with people with learning disabilities. I think it is interesting that the two main groups I have chosen to advocate for are those least able to represent themselves. The abuse of people with learning disabilities often stems from a belief that they are inferior or subhuman. For the last two years I have been campaigning against disability hate crime - a major problem in the UK. With hate crimes it is the vicim’s identity that’s under attack. I remember being struck by a Morrissey quote: “If you eat animals you surely hate them” How right he was. Our crimes against animals are the most prevalent hate crime of all.

 

Tim Gier:

May I ask a quick follow-up please?

 

Louise Wallis:

Sure

 

Tim Gier:

Thank you. You mentioned the vegan bubble. Do you think many vegans believe that being vegan has some cure-all effect on the world?

 

Louise Wallis:

done?

 

Tim Gier:

uh-oh, done!

 

Carolyn Bailey:

Hah! You're in trouble, Tim!

 

Louise Wallis:

Just checking! Okay ... yes Tim I think quite a few vegans believe this. I used to believe it in my more evangelical days. The older I get, I find the less I know. Humans are very complex, human behaviour very hard to fathom sometimes and it helps me to approach life with an open mind

 

Tim Gier:

Thank you, I agree and think it's worrisome. Now, Brooke Cameron is up with the next question, which we hope she'll ask eventually.... Brooke?

 

Brooke Cameron:

Thanks, Tim, I'm getting there! Hi Louise, you took time out from activism to focus on your music, but you still incorporate veganism into your music. Do you find that people are more open to the message of veganism when it’s presented to them in a less confrontational way? If so, does that say something about what we currently class as “vegan education” and it’s effectiveness?

 

Louise Wallis:

Hi Brooke. I wouldn’t say that I incorporate veganism into my music, although it has informed my music. For example I’m thinking of a particular track on my band’s album Violence/Ambience, a concept album about the clash between violence and beauty. ‘Menagerie’ begins with the voice of Nancy Phipps who witnessed her daughter Jill's death during a demonstration against the export of live animals. The track is a lament really, for Jill and for all the beautiful animals of the world who pass by in the song and say goodbye.

 

I knew Jill (& Nancy) and the track came about partly because of that. An attempt to make sense of something completely utterly senseless. It’s incredibly difficult to write issue-based or political songs without them sounding worthy or trite. The Clash were one of the few bands who made it seem effortless. For me the most important element of a piece of music is the emotion. But I do admire anyone who can pull off a protest song, a whole art in itself!

 

I really enjoyed researching and putting together my ‘Vegan Anthems’ DJ mix. I had no idea there were so many out there. But I didn’t include any old vegan anthem – they had to have musical merit. That was my starting point.

 

I think my vegan themed Dj mixes spread some joy around the vegan community. that's why I made them. I think it also helps to show we aren't so freaky after all, in fact we are really quite cool!

 

Brooke Cameron:

I remember hearing about Jill and Nancy’s story in Behind The Mask, Nancy seemed like an incredibly strong woman. Thanks, Louise!

 

Carolyn Bailey:

Thanks, Louise, Tim Gier will now ask the next question on behalf of Barbara DeGrande, thanks, Tim.

 

Tim Gier:

Barbara asks: Why do you think it is important for vegans to join orgs like The Vegan Society?

 

Louise Wallis:

Hi Barbara. I think it's important if we want to support veganism to grow. We can think of the Vegan Society as a kind of union, raising the status of vegans and looking after our interests as a community. For example, veganism is now a protected belief under UK equality law, protecting us from discrimination especially in the workplace. It’s good if we can try to focus on what unites us and not get too bogged down in ideological arguments.

 

Tim Gier:

Is it okay if I ask you a quick follow-up question to this one?

 

Louise Wallis:

Fire away Tim

 

Tim Gier:

Thanks! Do you know whether the Vegan Society has had any sort of negative feedback over their name? Some groups claim that the word "Vegan" scares people off.

 

Louise Wallis:

I know that the Vegan Society made a conscious decision not to make its name/logo prominent on the new film Making the Connection. It was explained to me that this was to ensure that people actually watched the film, which was of course the main aim. I understand that but I would not have voted for that decision myself 

 

Tim Gier:

Thanks Louise, Ben Hornby will now ask the next question.... go ahead please Ben...

 

Ben Hornby:

Thanks, Tim. Thanks for taking our questions today, Louise. You were part of the team responsible for making the film “Truth or Dairy” whilst with The Vegan Society, which was a humorous film aimed at drawing peoples’ attention to the dairy industry. Do you know how much impact this film had in educating others, and was the film aimed at vegetarians, or a broader audience?

 

Louise Wallis:

Hi Ben. Yes humour was a very important element of Truth or Dairy. The Vegan Society’s latest film ‘Making the Connection’ is really good, but lacks the humorous element, which is a shame I feel.

 

Truth or Dairy was aimed at a broader audience, and made with schools in mind especially. It sought to explain the who, what, why, how, where and when of veganism in a nutshell. I’m afraid I don’t know what impact the film had in educating others but I would imagine a significant one. We kept it fairly short, and upbeat in flavour. Benjamin the presenter is an upbeat character which also helped. Moby provided some of the music for free.

 

Ben Hornby:

Sounds great, thank you!

 

Louise Wallis:

You're welcome

 

Carolyn Bailey:

Thanks, Louise. Tim Gier is up again now, thanks, Tim

 

Tim Gier:

When you consider campaigns you’ve been involved in to end vivisection, was it your experience that the general public got the impression that you were unconcerned with other forms of animal exploitation?

 

Louise Wallis:

Hi Tim. Hmm … that’s an interesting question. I don’t know is the answer! Vivisection was something that really upset me as a teenager – I even wrote a sonnet about it in English which the teacher then read out to the class – acutely embarrassing! For me, vivisection was the gateway to the animal rights movement. It was the issue that got me interested enough to find out what else we did to animals. I think vivisection is a way in for many people.

 

Tim Gier:

Thank you Louise, Jason Ward has the next question, Jason? 

 

Jason Ward:

Thanks Tim. Realizing that it’s impossible for anyone to predict the future, based on what you’ve seen in your years of activism, what do you imagine the next 10 or 15 years hold for the animal protection movement?  

 

Louise Wallis:

Hi Jason. Wow, that's a tough question. It’s funny as I was only saying to Karin Ridgers (founder of VeggieVision TV channel) yesterday – who could have predicted that it would not be campaigners but celebrity chefs who exposed the plight of farm animals in a big way on national prime time TV? (In the UK, two top chefs have devoted television series to this).

 

I like life’s surprises and unexpected twists. I think veganism is going to explode in the next 15 years – at least in the West. (In China and India unfortunately meat-eating is on the rise). People’s preconceptions are changing, they are finally starting to see the positives in being vegan instead of only the negatives – i.e. what you can’t have. I recently interviewed Johnny Marr (guitarist in The Smiths) who’s been vegan since 2005. I love his take on this, he told me: “Giving up things doesn't mean sacrifice or misery to me, I see it as the opposite, it's interesting. I ‘took on’ being vegetarian, I didn't ‘give up’ something, if you see what I mean”. I see exactly what Johnny means, I’ve always felt that being vegan has enhanced my life not diminished it, as most people wrongly assume.

 

Jason Ward:

Thank you Louise

 

Carolyn Bailey:

Thanks Louise! I’d like to ask Jesse Newman to ask the last of the pre-registered questions for today now. If there are others who’d like to address Louise, please let one of the ARZone admins know by selecting their name and choosing “private chat”.  Thanks, Jesse.

 

Jesse Newman:

Thank you! Jerry Vlasak was here last week and he seems to think that violence against people who abuse other animals is inevitable. What do you think?

 

Louise Wallis:

Hi Jesse. I think violence begets violence, and that you cannot teach non-violence by being violent. I also think we hurt ourselves when we use violence. This is a point that Donald Watson (the person who coined the word vegan) often made.

 

I’ll give you an example. When I worked undercover as a trainee animal technician I was very clear that my role was a witness. I would never participate in any way, even if refusing to do so put my investigation at risk. As part of my job, I got to go to college on day release to study. It gave me an insight into the theory behind ‘animal technology’ and got me out of the lab one day a week. One day I got to college to find that today was the day we were being taught how to kill rats by breaking their necks. Each student was allocated a rat. I said I didn’t feel ready to do it, which was accepted without question. My refusal didn’t make a blind bit of difference to that rat, which was killed by another student, but it did make a difference to me: to my sanity and emotional well-being.

 

Will:

who was killed

 

Louise Wallis:

Point taken Will

 

Will:

:-D

 

Jesse Newman:

Thank you, I think it's important to not be involved in violent acts as much as we can help. I guess what Vlasak was saying was that in the history of social movements, there's always been some violence, not that he wants to see it.

 

Louise Wallis:

Yes indeed. Thanks for that Jesse

 

Jesse Newman:

Thank you! :-)

 

Carolyn Bailey:

Thanks very much, Louise! This concludes the pre-registered questions for today. I’d like now to open the chat up to others who may wish to speak with Louise, and begin by asking Brooke Cameron to ask the first question in this open session. Thanks, Brooke

 

Brooke Cameron:

Louise, there was some controversy a few months ago about The Vegan Society taking money for an advert in their Vegan magazine from a Restaurant/Retreat who served vegetarian meals (dairy). Do you have an opinion on these type of establishments being advertised in this magazine, and what would you suggest those who live in areas without vegan establishments do, other than not leave the house? Thanks!

 

Louise Wallis:

Thanks Brooke. Yes I remember the controversy well. The Society's magazine has always carried adverts for vegetarian guest houses & restaurants. It is hard for vegan establishments to be economically viable at present although hopefully that it changing. It's not ideal but people won't go vegan if they can't find anywhere that caters for them!

 

Brooke Cameron:

Thanks, Louise.

 

Susana María Velay:

Louise are a bright person. Thanks for this moment here. Louise, please, continues to give your light to the world. It was an honor to be here. Peace to all ! Love is what will save the world. Bye ! Thank you very much !

 

Louise Wallis:

Hello Susana. What a lovely thing to say! Thank you. I wish the same to you :-) 

 

Susana María Velay:

from Buenos Aires, Argentina, love to all !

 

Carolyn Bailey:

Thanks, Susana! And, thanks, again, Louise. Sky would like to ask the next question. Thanks, Sky

 

Sky:

Hi Louise. Truth or Dairy is on YT - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yf2Ce5Xo2G0 I love when Benjamin Z. talks about the baby food/breast milk of other animals. Made in 1994 I think - so do you think it is still useful to show at meetings, etc?

 

Louise Wallis:

Hi Sky. I watched Truth or Dairy on youtube not long ago and was surprised to find it holds up quite well for its age, it hasn't dated as much as I thought it might. I think you can still show it at meetings but I'm aware that there are now many films promoting veganism so maybe best to pick the one you think is most suitable for the audience?

 

Sky:

Hi - and thanks Louise. You are doing a good job. So you think the facts and figures are still OK?

 

Louise Wallis:

Hmmm ... now that I can't say  for sure. Maybe you have to qualify it by saying bear in mind this film was made in 1994!!!!

 

Sky:

Thanks!! :-)

 

Louise Wallis:

And thanks Sky that's very kind of you to say :-)

 

Carolyn Bailey:

Thanks, Louise. The adorable Jason Ward would like to ask a question now, thanks, Jay.

 

Jason Ward:

Going back to your 'Vegan Anthems' you mentioned earlier - what is your current favourite Vegan Anthem?

 

Louise Wallis:

Hmmm another tough one (stroking chin). I think Pigs In There by Robert Wyatt really gets under your skin. He wrote the music for The Animals Film too and it really makes the film very unsettling to watch

 

Jason Ward:

thanks :-)

 

Louise Wallis:

You're welcome Jason

 

Carolyn Bailey:

Thanks, Louise. Do you have a favourite vegan anthem, Jason?

 

Louise Wallis:

You beat me to it Carolyn!

 

Jason Ward:

That's a tough question - I love so many songs - and many fit the anthem niche

 

Roger Yates:

Robert Wyatt:- http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BcwBH-WnlhM

 

Louise Wallis:

Thanks Roger. It's an oldie but special I think

 

Carolyn Bailey:

Thanks, Will would like to ask the next question, go ahead, Will.

 

Will:

u have probably answered this really but i am sick of groups & their 'vegetarian starter packs' that are actually all vegan. like barbara defantastic said in the last arz podcast with robin lane what is wrong with these people? just be truthful yes?

 

Louise Wallis:

Yes. I wish they would be called vegan starter packs too. Be truthful, be honest don't hide your veganism under a bushel!

 

Carolyn Bailey:

Well said, Louise!

 

Louise Wallis:

:-)

 

Carolyn Bailey:

For the last question of today, Tim Gier would like to address you, Louise. Thanks, Tim.

 

Tim Gier:

A few weeks ago we asked our members about their journey toward veganism. In your experience do most vegans say they start by being vegetarian, and if so, what do you think that means?

 

Carolyn Bailey:

Tim didn't say "Done" again!

 

Sadia:

:-)

 

Tim Gier:

Done again

 

Louise Wallis:

Thanks for this Tim. Yes the vast majority of vegans I know went vegetarian before going vegan. But then this is usually because they didn't know any better.I was vegetarian but turning vegan but only very briefly. two months I think. When I read a Vegan Society leaflet I immediately knew I was vegan. I was living at home at the time and went vegan with my boyfriend when we went on a week's holiday I have never looked back, or regretted my choice although obviously it can be a pain in the ass when you are starving and just want to grab a sandwich and there are three sandwiches that are nearly but not quite vegan apart from a trace of mayo. Grrr

 

Will:

nice one!

 

Tim Gier:

Thank you Louise!

 

Carolyn Bailey:

Thanks, Louise!

 

Louise Wallis:

What do you think Tim?

 

Tim Gier:

I think that as most people begin to seriously think about their relationship to the other animals of the world the first natural step is towards vegetarianism. I think it isn't a matter of what information they have, but a process...

 

Carolyn Bailey:

I'd like to thank you sincerely for your time and your great insight today, Louise. We really do appreciate it very much!

 

Richard McMahan:

Thanks Louise.

 

Louise Wallis:

Thanks for having me!

 

Sadia:

So Groovy of you to be here. Much appreciate your time. And a delight to have met you Ms. Wallis!

 

Will:

byeeeee louise 8-)

 

Sky:

Bye!!

 

Jason Ward:

Bye Louise - thanks for your time here today :-)

 

Ben Hornby:

Thanks Louise, great chat, and wonderful advice!

 

Barbara DeGrande:

Thank you for your time and responses, Louise!

 

Roger Yates:

Thanks Louise. Good chat!

 

Louise Wallis:

Carolyn you're a marvel. Its been an honour to chat with you all and I thoroughly enjoyed it once I got over my nerves and got used to the format

 

Brooke Cameron:

It was wonderful to hear you defending the word "vegan" Louise, thanks for that, and for everything else. :-)

 

Carolyn Bailey:

You were great, Louise!

 

Tim Gier:

Thanks Louise! It's a been a pleasure.

 

Fifi Leigh:

thanks

 

Louise Wallis:

Thanks very much, more power to Animal Rights Zone I am hugely impressed.

 

Jesse Newman:

Thank you Louise. :-)

 

Roger Yates:

:-)

 

Carolyn Bailey:

Thanks, Louise, we hope you hang around here more! :-)

 

Louise Wallis:

A special thanks to all the admins and Carolyn in particular whose quiet efficiency made the experience so smooth and problem-free.

 

Sadia:

:-)

 

Louise Wallis:

Goodnight all

 

Carolyn Bailey:

Bye Louise! :-)

 

Tim Gier:

Bye Louise!

 

Roger Yates:

See you Louise!

 

Mangus O’Shales:

another good one!

 

Kate:

Thanks Louise. You were great.  :-D I mean you are great! and thanks also to everyone for being here for another great chat event :-)

 

 

 

ARZone exists to promote rational discussion about our relations with other animals and about issues within the animal advocacy movement. Please continue the debate after “chats” by starting a forum discussion or making a point under a transcript.

 

 


 

Views: 388

Tags: Anti-Vivisection, DJ-Luminous, Louise-Wallis, The-Vegan-Society, Transcript, UK, vegan, veganism

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Comment by Louise Wallis on September 22, 2011 at 20:10

Thanks Barbara. 

 

The word 'vegetarian' once had negative connotations for many people, but we didn't stop using it and because of this it has gradually gone on to gain acceptance.

 

I do think the word vegan is largely a victim of the modern obsession with marketing and focus groups.

 

Let's challenge negative preconceptions about veganism - not buy into or reinforce them. Enough with the self-loathing!

Comment by Louise Wallis on September 19, 2011 at 21:08

A footnote to my Live Chat - when thinking about the word vegan, remember that the same thing has happened to the word 'feminist'!

 

Although feminist simply means a person supporting equality for women, the word itself has been so distorted and denigrated that some women actively distance themselves from it. A truly crazy situation, which tells us a lot about the power of patriarchy.

 

We mustn't let the same thing happen to the word vegan.

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Based on a work at www.arzone.ning.com.
Permissions beyond the scope of this license may be available at www.arzone.ning.com.

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Animal Rights Zone (ARZone) Disclaimer

Animal Rights Zone (ARZone) is an animal rights site. As such, it is the position of ARZone that it is only by ending completely the use of other animal as things can we fulfill our moral obligations to them.

Please read the full site disclosure here.

Animal Rights Zone (ARZone) Mission Statement

Animal Rights Zone (ARZone) exists to help educate vegans and non-vegans alike about the obligations human beings have toward all other animals.

Please read the full mission statement here.

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